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Leaving Cert ag science papers garner positive reaction

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'The Leaving Cert agricultural science papers for this year – the second last year of the current exam format, with the new specification being introduced in September – received a generally positive reaction, according to the Irish Agricultural Science Teachers’ Association (IASTA) PRO, Willie White. “The reaction to the higher level paper was, in general, very positive.Students had a good range of questions to choose from and the well prepared student should have done well.A nice feature of the paper was that it included questions relating to contemporary issues in agriculture such as last year’s drought, fodder shortages and the recent authorisation by the EU for the extended use of glyphosate. ‘Question 1, which is worth most marks, was perhaps a bit more challenging than other years with more emphasis on the biology aspects of the course.The paper probably favoured those that knew their crop production well as it tended to focus slightly more on this than animal production with surprisingly few questions on dairy, for example,” Willie said.Trick parts “It was not all plain sailing, however, as there were trick parts; for example, to list four causes of increased soil acidity over time or to list and give a reason for four precautions taken when using chemical sprays,” said the IASTA PRO.Ordinary level “The reaction to the ordinary level paper was also generally positive with most considering it a well-balanced paper.Some commented that the pictures of common farmland machinery question in section A made a welcome return,” said Willie, who teaches at St.Peter’s College in Wexford.The new specification will be examined for the first time in June 2021.It represents the first ever overhaul of the Leaving Cert agricultural science syllabus, which was introduced in 1972.The IASTA has been calling for decades for the updating of the syllabus to reflect the changes in modern agriculture.The new syllabus will reflect the changes in technology and the emphasis on sustainability.The 25% for practical work will remain.In previous years, around 8,000 students sat the exam. . The post Leaving Cert ag science papers garner positive reaction appeared first on Agriland.ie .'

Longford man elected president of Irish Charolais Cattle Society

Good News Agriland.ie

Longford native Noel McGoldrick has been elected president of the Irish Charolais Cattle Society.McGoldrick owns the Cloonohill Pedigree Charolais herd, which was established in 1999, and says he is “very positive” about the future of the
'Longford native Noel McGoldrick has been elected president of the Irish Charolais Cattle Society.McGoldrick owns the Cloonohill Pedigree Charolais herd, which was established in 1999, and says he is “very positive” about the future of the organisation.Speaking to AgriLand , the north Longford man said he will hold the new position for a term of 12 months initially and, if uncontested thereafter, has the option to remain on as president for a total of three years. “It’s a great honour for me to represent a long-established society such as this,” he added before pointing to the turbulence within the sector and his hopes for a better 12 months ahead. “These are certainly turbulent times; in fact this is the most turbulent time the sector has ever seen but for the last 12 months our society breed has been doing well.” McGoldrick went on to say that while other areas within the sector were decreasing the Charolais breed was holding its own.It has a higher clearance rate and a higher average than many others out there; we want to improve on that and push out the boundaries.He added: “At the moment the suckler cow herd – nationally – is in decline and has been, in fact, for nine years.I feel that there hasn’t been enough done to minimise the exodus that has occurred.” McGoldrick went on to point out that, on the back of that, there is a strong possibility that the Charolais service could grow. “Charolais is between €200 and €250 dearer and what speaks to farmers is bottom-line,” he continued.That is what Charolais cattle are all about – the bottom line.Meanwhile, Mattie Kelly from Newbridge, Ballinasloe, Co.Galway will take over as the society’s treasurer.He runs the Cloughbrack Pedigree Charolais herd, which was established in 1993, and was elected to the council in 2018 having served as chairman of the Galway Charolais Club for a number of years.Christy Comerford from Castlewarren, Co.Kilkenny was re-elected vice-president of the Society.He runs the well-known Knockmahon Pedigree and Commercial Charolais herd and was elected to council in 2017.He has served as vice-president of the Irish Charolais Cattle Society since March 2018. . The post Longford man elected president of Irish Charolais Cattle Society appeared first on Agriland.ie .'