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On the go: Irish dairy ‘finding its voice’ in the online world

Food Agriland.ie

The Irish dairy industry has had to change with the times to ensure that its key messages are landing with consumers, according to CEO of the National Dairy Council (NDC) Zoe Kavanagh.
'The Irish dairy industry has had to change with the times to ensure that its key messages are landing with consumers, according to CEO of the National Dairy Council (NDC) Zoe Kavanagh.Speaking on the latest episode of FarmLand , the CEO outlined the changes brought about in media and communications – as well as the key opportunities she sees for Irish dairy.On the rapid change in recent years, she said: “In the good old days you’d make a lovely TV ad and a radio campaign to work alongside it and you’d assume that the population at large would hear the messages. “But now what we have is a media which has no boundaries – so we’re very much in the online world; we’re very much into a shorter attention span. “If I look at the population base, and I look at the most urgent audience to ensure we have a relationship with and land the key facts, it is the young, questioning consumer; the future parents in Ireland.And the approach to engage with them is very much ‘dairy finding its voice’ out of home, on the go and in the online world in a way that is relevant. “And that’s not just in Ireland.We are now operating at a European level with our equivalents as well as at an international level.” Kavanagh outlined that currently all of the dairy councils internationally are focused on the same three agendas.These, she said, are: How can we deliver an information package around the nutritional benefits?How can we reassure around the ethical production standards? and What’s our response on climate change?Turning to the levels of collaboration in dairy between countries, Kavanagh continued: “What’s interesting from a collaborative point of view here in Ireland is we can really collaborate internationally around nutrition; we can collaborate to a certain extent on climate change. “But when it comes to ethical production and grass-based systems and family farming, actually the collaboration isn’t so strong. “Because Ireland is unique and almost becomes disruptive within our equivalents at a European level because we’ve got such a unique story.” The CEO said that this story is around the grass-based system and water usage, highlighting that 99% of the water that used is rainfall, with almost no water stress and a family farm model. “That’s very different from anywhere in the world.New Zealand to a certain extent is comparable but they have some water stresses that we wouldn’t have. “So almost, the opportunity around responding to climate change and engaging with the consumer around it is I believe Ireland’s unique selling point and where I believe we can win,” she said. . The post On the go: Irish dairy ‘finding its voice’ in the online world appeared first on Agriland.ie .'

Which consumers are cutting back on dairy – and why?

Food Agriland.ie

The young questioning female consumer is the main demographic subset that is actively cutting down on dairy – something that needs to be addressed, according to CEO of the National Dairy Council (NDC) Zoe Kavanagh.
'The young questioning female consumer is the main demographic subset that is actively cutting down on dairy – something that needs to be addressed, according to CEO of the National Dairy Council (NDC) Zoe Kavanagh.Speaking on the latest episode of FarmLand , Kavanagh highlighted that a challenge for the NDC is to ensure that it is “landing messages in a way that is truly comprehensive and trusted about how our product is being produced, but also around the nutritional benefits”. When asked about recent research showing that 41% of Irish women and 30% of men are “cutting back on dairy”, the CEO said: “That particular avoidance is quite specific to the 20 to 29-year-old female; she’s typically in an urban environment and she’s questioning for three reasons for limiting or moderating dairy in the diet.Fat; allergy; and intolerance – they are the three areas where most of the health questioning is coming from for dairy. “Where’s that coming from?Well, again I’ll come back to the online world, a lot of celebrities and influencers promoting diets around dropping dress sizes and just having a better image – and they’re suggesting you can do that by limiting or moderating dairy in the diet. “So that’s a real challenge and a real concern.Because if we don’t address that and presume when those young women become mothers, ‘they’ll just come back to the dairy aisles when completing their family shop’, I think we’re mistaken. “Because sadly, that young, questioning female consumer has found alternatives which she believes are helping her with her fat, allergy and intolerance.And, as we know, the dairy alternative products that are appearing in-store, at twice the price and a fraction of the nutrition, are not nutritionally equivalent.They are just incomparable. “So the challenge we have is how do we educate that young female that she’s missing out on a whole suite of vital nutrition by going for the dairy alternatives?I think we have two jobs here.” The first of these, Kavanagh said, is to engage with the consumer directly and outline the benefits of dairy, both directly and indirectly.This, she added, is done through health professionals and dairy ambassadors from sport and fashion to “reassure that questioning consumer around the nutritional benefits”. “But furthermore, with retailers.And I think what we’re witnessing now is we’ve retailers that are quite frankly using milk as a loss leader to reassure their customers that they are delivering good value – and yet, at the same time, are giving more shelf space to these dairy alternatives that are much, much higher price but a fraction of the nutritional content. “And that’s putting margin in their back pockets.I think there’s a body of work for us to do, along with branded suppliers, to actually work with retailers.I’ve seen in Australia they’re actually increasing the cost of dairy to the consumer as a means of reassuring the consumer as to the nutritional benefits. “Because if you keep cheapening the price of a highly nutritious product, you’re almost suggesting it’s not good for you. “So, from a population health point of view, I think we’ve a big, big body of work to do at retail level to present our products as being part of a population health solution,” Kavanagh concluded. . The post Which consumers are cutting back on dairy – and why? appeared first on Agriland.ie .'

Aurivo announces price for June milk supplies

Food Agriland.ie

The board of Aurivo has set its milk price for supplies in June, which was announced today, Tuesday, July 16.Aurivo will pay a 30.5c/L base price for June.
'The board of Aurivo has set its milk price for supplies in June, which was announced today, Tuesday, July 16.Aurivo will pay a 30.5c/L base price for June.The processor said that: “The pressure on returns is noted and current milk price does not reflect current returns, in particular due to lower butter prices in the market.” This figure is the same as the offering for May supplies.Aurivo becomes the latest processor to announce its June price, following on from the other announcements made last week.Other processors On Friday, July 12, Kerry announced that it would hold its price for June supplies, standing on 30.5c/L including VAT. “Based on average June milk solids, the price return inclusive of vat and bonuses is 33.114c/L,” said a statement from Kerry.The previous day, Thursday, July 11, Glanbia announced that it will pay its member milk suppliers 30.5c/L including VAT for June manufacturing milk supplies at 3.6% butterfat and 3.3% protein.Glanbia Ireland (GI) will hold its base milk price for June of 30c/L including VAT, for manufacturing milk at 3.6% fat and 3.3% protein.Also, the board of Glanbia Co-op has decided to make a support payment to members of 0.5c/L including VAT for June milk supplies.On Wednesday, July 10, Lakeland announced a price in the Republic of Ireland of 31.28c/L including VAT for milk supplied in June.In Northern Ireland, a price of 25.25p/L will be paid for June supplies.Like in the Republic, the base price has been held for the last three successive months.A Lakeland representative said: “While supply in many of the large milk production regions remains subdued, there continues to be weakness in the global dairy markets.In particular, butter prices are under increasingly downward pressure.” . The post Aurivo announces price for June milk supplies appeared first on Agriland.ie .'

Kerry milk price unchanged for June

Food Agriland.ie

Kerry Group has become the latest processor to reveal its milk price revealing an unchanged figure for June supplies.
'Kerry Group has become the latest processor to reveal its milk price revealing an unchanged figure for June supplies.In a statement, a spokesperson for the processor said: Our Kerry Group base price for June milk supplies remains unchanged at 30.5c/L including VAT. “Based on average June milk solids, the price return inclusive of vat and bonuses is 33.114c/L.” This follows on from two earlier processor announcements this week.Other processors Glanbia will pay its member milk suppliers 30.5c/L including VAT for June manufacturing milk supplies at 3.6% butterfat and 3.3% protein.This will consist of a held base milk price for June of 30c/L including VAT, for manufacturing milk at 3.6% fat and 3.3% protein and a co-op payment of 0.5c/L including VAT.Meanwhile, Lakeland Dairies also decided to hold its price over from previous months.In the Republic of Ireland, a price of 31.28c/L including VAT has been agreed for milk supplied in June.The base price has been held for the last three successive months.In Northern Ireland, a price of 25.25p/L will be paid for June supplies.Like in the Republic, the base price has been held for the last three successive months.Commenting on the price, a spokesperson for the co-op said: “While supply in many of the large milk production regions remains subdued, there continues to be weakness in the global dairy markets.In particular, butter prices are under increasingly downward pressure.” . The post Kerry milk price unchanged for June appeared first on Agriland.ie .'

Glanbia announces milk price for June supplies

Food Agriland.ie

Glanbia has become the latest processor to announce its milk price for June supplies.Announcing its milk price today, Thursday, July 11, the processor will pay its member milk suppliers 30.5c/L including VAT for May manufacturing milk supplies at
'Glanbia has become the latest processor to announce its milk price for June supplies.Announcing its milk price today, Thursday, July 11, the processor will pay its member milk suppliers 30.5c/L including VAT for May manufacturing milk supplies at 3.6% butterfat and 3.3% protein.Glanbia Ireland (GI) will hold its base milk price for May of 30c/L including VAT, for manufacturing milk at 3.6% fat and 3.3% protein.The board of Glanbia Co-op has decided to make a support payment to members of 0.5c/L including VAT for May milk supplies.Glanbia Chairman Martin Keane said: “Glanbia Ireland has maintained its base price of 30c/L for the high volume month of June. “However milk suppliers should note that returns from the market are below the current farm gate price.The board will continue to monitor developments on a monthly basis.” Lakeland June price Yesterday Lakeland Dairies became the first co-op to set a price for June milk.In the Republic of Ireland, a price of 31.28c/L including VAT has been agreed for milk supplied in June.The base price has been held for the last three successive months.In Northern Ireland, a price of 25.25p/L will be paid for June supplies.Like in the Republic, the base price has been held for the last three successive months.Commenting on the price, a spokesperson for the co-op said: While supply in many of the large milk production regions remains subdued, there continues to be weakness in the global dairy markets.In particular, butter prices are under increasingly downward pressure. “With butter prices at four-year lows, the co-op will continue to monitor the market closely.” . The post Glanbia announces milk price for June supplies appeared first on Agriland.ie .'

Annual average price for liquid milk supplies falls 5% in 2018

Food Agriland.ie


'The average annual price for milk supplied for liquid milk production in 2018 under all registered contracts was 5% lower than in 2017, according to new data from the National Milk Agency (NMA). The NMA’s Annual Report 2018 shows that, for milk supplied under all-year round (AYR) and winter contracts, the average price for the year was 36.16c/L.This was 1.84c/L lower than the average price for 2017, which was 38c/L.Meanwhile, the figures also show that the annual average liquid incentive paid under the Manufacturing Milk Price (MMP) system was 3.6c/L to 0.1c/L lower than in 2017.The study reveals that the average price for registered supplies paid under the MMP system was 36.31c/L, which also represents a decrease of 5%, or around 2.1c/L.The NMA is the body that regulates the supply of milk for liquid consumption throughout the state.Looking at the figures for suppliers, these show that the number of milk producers in the state in 2018 was estimated at 17,000, the same as in 2017.The average milk supply volume per producer was approximately 446,000L.The total domestic milk supply to creameries and pasteurisers in 2018 was approximately 7.6 billion litres, and increase of 322 million litres, or 4%, in 2017. 94% of these supplies were used in the manufacture of dairy products, which were mainly for export.The remaining 6% of supplies were processed for liquid consumption on the domestic market.The report highlighted that: “Abnormal weather conditions and a summer drought curtailed milk production in the first eight months of the year.Good autumn weather conditions brought about a surge of 15% in milk supplies in the final four months of the year.” Fresh milk market According to the report, the fresh milk market in Ireland had a retail value of €521 million in 2018.However, 579 million litres of it was consumed last year, a decrease of two million litres on 2017.With an annual consumption per person of 121L, this makes Ireland the country with the highest per capita fresh milk consumption in the world.Registered contracts The number of milk supply contracts in 2018 was 1,749, a decrease of 59 on the previous year.AYR contracts decreased by 54 to 1,749, while winter contracts decreased by five to 97.AYR contracts represent the vast majority of contract types, accounting for 94% of contracts and 99% of supplies – similar figures to 2017. . The post Annual average price for liquid milk supplies falls 5% in 2018 appeared first on Agriland.ie .'

Importing Brazilian beef would be ‘utterly bizarre’ – ICSA

Food Agriland.ie


'Implementing climate action policies in Ireland while the EU imports meat products from South America is “utterly bizarre”, according to the Irish Cattle and Sheep Farmers’ Association (ICSA). Eddie Punch, the association’s general secretary, said that, while farmers were “up for the challenge” of mitigating climate change, they would be “all the more committed” if it wasn’t for the contradictions in the proposed trade deal between the EU and the Mercosur trading bloc in South America. “Asking farmers to plant more trees and reduce livestock seems utterly bizarre when we’re planning to import more meat from a country (Brazil) that is cutting down rainforests,” said Punch.The Mercosur deal, potentially involving an extra 99,000t of beef, 200,000t of chicken/turkey and 600,000 tons of ethanol, will totally undermine farmers in Europe, particularly in the red meat sector. “This deal will push cattle farmers over the edge in terms of viability.Without viable incomes, farmers cannot deliver climate change actions, which cost time and money,” Punch warned.He added: “The deep irony is that all of this is being delivered to enable Germany to sell even more internal combustion engine cars and parts in South America.How can you square that contradiction?” Punch was speaking following the launch today, Thursday, June 27, of the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine’s Climate Adaption Plan.At the launch, Minister Michael Creed was challenged by a representative of the Irish Farmers’ Association (IFA) on the “EU Commission’s hypocrisy on climate and trade”. Thomas Cooney, the IFA’s environment chairperson, asked the minister if the environmental measures farmers face would be in vain if a Mercosur deal goes ahead.The minister responded by saying that he couldn’t veto a deal that he hadn’t seen, and added that he would not rule out a veto of the Mercosur deal. . The post Importing Brazilian beef would be ‘utterly bizarre’ – ICSA appeared first on Agriland.ie .'